PRESS FOR WHITNEYBIENNIAL.COM :

+ NEW YORK TIMES, MARCH 08,
+ NEW YORK TIMES, MARCH 04,
+ NEWSWEEK, MARCH 19
+ LE MONDE , MARCH 26
+ EL PAIS , MARCH 29
+ THE GUARDIAN, MARCH 21
+ SALON.COM

+ ARTNET.COM
+ NEURAL.IT
+ ARTANDJOBMAGAZINE.COM

ARTFORUM, MAI 2002 ( Mild About Larry: 2002 Whitney Biennial
Bob Nickas, Bruce Hainley, George Baker, and Saul Anton )

Read : Benjamin Bratton (rhizome)

TAKE THE WB BANNER FOR YOUR WEBSITE


INFO@WHITNEYBIENNIAL.COM

PICTURES FROM THE SHOW, PRINT QUALITY

 


HERE ARE SOME SAMPLES OF THE DISCUSSION ABOUT THE SHOW. SOME OF THE PUBLIC, IS UNCOMFORTABLE WITH THE FACT THAT THE U-HAULS WHICH HAVE BEEN USED TO ADVERTISE THE EXHIBITION WERE INDEED INVISIBLE....

 

joyce charis, an architect who has a piece in the show , says (e-mail ):

...realizing that the real u-hauls are the websites makes sense! It was really a brilliant "finale" of all the '80's and 90's art projects.
To see that you need this experience of having "visualized" the art work and then go in this "purification" of art, this is great!
The cynical point were you reach the avant-garde. I am happy for having been there with you.


dustin amery hostetler , writes (e-mail ) :


its amazing how, on Friday, there were like 15 minutes where I wanted to see you burnt at the stake...
and now, with a few days away from the computer.. I have to say.. I think what you did is.. well.. interesting.

Jennifer and Kevin McCoy , both artists who have a piece in the show , says (e-mail ):

NICE ONE! The show is great -- so much interesting, beautiful work. The U-haul hoax is great. We have heard some grumbling from "establishment people" about being fooled, but that is their problem. Great art, great party, great hoax. We think it's excellent. we want to make some more "flash jokes" because we really liked the one we did.

 

Marina Olson, one of the curators invited to propose artists, feels tricked (e-mail):


As fun and meaningful as it is to be part of an important critique and a truly significant cultural "event," there is a bit of embarrassment, internally and externally, at feeling tricked.

 


Patric Markesano, an architect who participated in the show, laments to NY Times Arts Columnist, Matthew Mirapaul:


Mr. Mirapaul,
This letter is in regard to your New York Times article (March 4th)...
My name is Patrick Marckesano and I am a contributor to the architecture and design portal, ARCHINECT.COM. Through Mr. Manetas gross misrepresentation, our website and a few other prominent "design community" portals were duped into soliciting works from our readers.
Initial e-mail correspondence and the subsequent website brief by Mr. Manetas gave us no reason to doubt the project's association with the Whitney. When at last, it was revealed that Mr. Manetas was staging a guerilla or "competitive" exhibition, many contributors salvaged their interest in the project through the prospect of the physical (projector-loaded truck) exhibition.
At Mr. Manetas' encouragement, I personally made a trip to New York City to witness the event. Sadly, it did not materialize.In fact Mr. Manetas never had any intention of staging such an event. It was all part of an elaborate hoax designed to generate publicity for his website. Chicanery and media stunts are nothing new in the art world, but rarely do we witness such unscrupulous fraud perpetrated against an event's own participants.
While Mr. Manetas may feel proud with the apparent buzz surrounding his recent non-event, I and many others were displeased by his waste of our time and energies. It is hard enough for artists/architects to succeed in today's world can't escape the feeling that Mr. Manetas art·was little more than the unethical exploitation of creative minds for his own personal gain.
Sincerely,
Patrick Marckesano

This letter, starts a long discussion at Archinect * ...

Manetas replies :


The U-hauls were never suppose to happen : it was a clever way to get publicity for a show with budged zero made in less than a month.
But the U-hauls were also there : they are the internet pages which host the exhibition: they are invisible vehicles, better and faster than the real ones. Of course, I couldn't say that to the artists or to anybody else, because then it would have never worked.

Andreas Angelidakis replies :


Just imagine the UHauls going up and down Madison: ugly trucks, with out-of-focus shaking projections, obscured by passing traffic. Probably half the projections would not work, the laptops would crash from the movement etc. You get the picture?
instead you get an urban legend, a Loch Ness monster that never materializes, a U.F.O some people claimed to see. And of course a stunning collection of works on line.

Muserna , an artist who is not partecipating in the show, says :
Well Miltos, after your fiasco, I am sure the public will be tired of dealing with you!

Miltos replies : I really hope so : I will relax to Los Angeles then...

cary murnion from HONEST.COM is still very disappointed:
we are asking miltos to remove our work from his site because of all the shenanigans he's been pulling.I hope that more artists/designers will do the same.

Jordan Krane , a designer who participated in the show, says :


If Miltos wants to call what he did art, fine, I really don't have a problem with that.
He has gotten allot of attention, which was one of his goal. Was the project successful? maybe? did it get all of us talking? yes. (and believe me it is fun trying to explain to your Mom , when she asks you, " so your sister said you were in the Whitney Museum, with your art , how did it go?")

Somebody who signs as HONEST ARTIST says :


MM, Just go away!

thorsten iberl, on of the artists of the show, says( e-mail ) :

the u-haul-hoax is great! it is always surprising how easy people can be
made talking about sth, getting nervous about sth... using the media etc.
today, unfortunately,it is all about the appearance, and very often not
about the content, or the artist behind...
.
a drink :

> > currently I'm not visiting this site until miltos buys matt mirapaul a
> > drink.

> > Oh, hell! I think MM needs to get Matt a Uhaul full of the highest grade
Thai hookers and a fully stocked wet/hashish/oxygen bar, plus a couple small
Palladium ingots.


*
http://www.archinect.com/discuss_cgi/groups/0375.html

THE NYTIMES WHITNEY BIENNIAL REVUE MENTION THE WWW.WHITNEYBIENNIAL.COM:
""The Internet is the ultimate (so far, anyway) tribal site, with all the implications of concord and conflict that implies."" and : ""The biennial has even inspired a Web site of its own, albeit an unofficial one. Created by the artist Miltos Manetas just days before the opening, it's meant to be a kind of online counterexhibition, providing access to the work of dozens of Internet-based artists not in the show itself (www.WhitneyBiennial.com).""
Spiritual America, From Ecstatic to Transcendent , By HOLLAND COTTER

HERE IS ALSO THE ARTICLE OF Matthew Mirapaul

March 4, 2002 If You Can't Join 'Em, You Can Always Tweak 'Em

By MATTHEW MIRAPAUL

t would seem that nearly everyone interested in art has an opinion about the Whitney Museum of American Art's biennial survey of contemporary work. Since the Whitney's selections for the 2002 Biennial were announced in November, artists, curators and gallery owners have been chewing over the choices, a discussion that will only intensify once the exhibition opens on Thursday. One night last December, after conducting his own review of the 113 artists selected for the biennial, Miltos Manetas decided to set up a Web site on which he could publish his own thoughts on the perpetually controversial exhibition. On a whim, Mr. Manetas, a painter who dabbles in other media, checked an online database of Web addresses. He was surprised to learn that no one, including the museum, had staked a claim on an obvious address: WhitneyBiennial.com. He registered it immediately. (The museum's Web site is at Whitney.org.) Although Mr. Manetas, 37, has never been invited to show his work in a Whitney Biennial, he described the Web address's availability as a way for the museum to commission him subconsciously: "It was like a message from them: `Please bug us.' '`

The Internet has made it relatively fast and easy for anyone with a computer to bedevil entrenched governments, mammoth corporations and venerable museums. As these institutions embrace the Internet, they became more vulnerable, with their own online offerings ripe for criticism and parody, not to mention the embarrassing possibility that someone searching the Net will stumble upon a rogue site and think it authentic. This is the second Whitney Biennial to include nearly a dozen works of Internet-based art, so it seems natural that Mr. Manetas would opt to use cyberspace as his soapbox.

WhitneyBiennial.com goes online today, three days before the Whitney's real-world exhibition opens. But the plans have changed. Instead of Mr. Manetas's comments, his site contains 120 digital art works from 80 contributors. Each work is a small animated graphic, and the site allows visitors to take six at a time and combine them into an onscreen collage in which a yellow bird might collide with a spinning purple mandala.

This kind of interaction is not encouraged at the Whitney, where any attempt to mix and match the masterpieces will provoke the security guards. To drive this point home on the Upper East Side, Mr. Manetas has rented 23 U-Haul trucks that will circle the Whitney during a V.I.P. biennial reception tomorrow evening. Each truck will be turned into a mobile easel, with a computer inside projecting the site's works onto a curtain of fabric stretched across the vehicle's back opening.

Mr. Manetas said he envisioned the procession as a live version of "Broadway Boogie-Woogie," Mondrian's Manhattan landscape. Told that his convoy might be mistaken for a legitimate entry in the biennial, he said, "I want that."

If the museum is indeed bugged by these stunts, Maxwell L. Anderson, the Whitney's director, is not about to let on. He said of Mr. Manetas's efforts: "I don't know that too many other institutions of our girth would take all this with a sense of humor. There would be a bit of concern about the brand. But we don't feel that way."

Mr. Anderson also understands that the Internet provides a more public forum for the dissent that biennials often engender. He said: "I would suggest that since what happens on the Internet is a manifestation of any kind of human interaction, these sorts of exchanges were happening in smoky rooms during biennials in the 1960's, and we simply weren't aware of them. But there's nothing new about irritation with authority or an attempt to upend authority through guerrilla action."

Yael Kanarek, a New York digital artist, took a rocky landscape from her "World of Awe," one of the online works in the official biennial, and adapted it for Mr. Manetas's site. She said the digital medium's malleability made it possible for her to participate in both exhibitions, adding, "True, one is a bit stiff but all- powerful; the other is experimental and lively." Either way, she said, "I'm with my peers on both sides."

Mr. Manetas insisted that his site was not intended to be viewed as an alternative biennial, an Internet-era version of the Impressionists' Salon des Refuse With so much attention focused on the museum's exhibition, he said, "I just wanted to use the Whitney Biennial as a free advertisement" for his ideas.

Mr. Manetas wants to make two points, neither of which has much relevance to the Whitney Biennial. As the site's collage function is meant to demonstrate, digital technology can empower nonartists to do creative things. In this environment, where anyone can piggyback on the work of others, Mr. Manetas is also concerned that the enforcement of copyrights will hinder expression.

Even if one accepts his statement that the site is not a direct attack on the Whitney, just using the address WhitneyBiennial.com implies an element of criticism. Peter Lunenfeld, who teaches media design at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif., and served as one of Mr. Manetas's curators, acknowledged this. With online art featured last year in high-profile exhibitions at the Whitney and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, he said, the Net was losing its shaggy aesthetic.

"People are starting to get a sense of portentousness and pretentiousness coming out of the museum community, because that's what museums are good at," he said.

WhitneyBiennial.com is meant to restore some spontaneity to the Web. So, he said, `it's disingenuous to say that there's no critique involved," even if it is low on Mr. Manetas's priority list.

Viewed as criticism, though, Mr. Manetas's Web project does a disservice to the 10 online art works in this year's biennial, which are such a major improvement over the nine works selected for the 2000 Biennial that they deserve better than indirect ridicule.

chris otto , writes at Rhizome:

I think the fact that it didn't happen actually made it better. i was mainly against it as I felt he tried to appropriate the methods of the people inside for manetas gain sort of trying to take their street knowledge and make it his. in the end he sort of did so by creating a huge spectacle in his own style of simulacrum screen etc.
I don't think it is the greatest piece ever but I think it involves the art of the internet/cellphone technology that changes daily life.

Patrick Lichty , one of the curators invited to propose artists, writes in Rhizome :


..for Manetas pulling a PR slip to get out of hot water, all I have to say is NEEN.


and Kathleen Cullen , artists who have a piece in the show , says (e-mail ):


Thanks Miltos. I love it...


and David Zerah , an artist who have a piece in the show , is positive (e-mail ):

I like the www.whitneybiennial.com because it's so strongly subversive. In an international way and in a local way too : People and institution from where I live (Rennes in France) don't really understand why I'am suddenly in a so well name known show !

 

One of the artists of the show is not happy at all..., his website indeed is stayhonest!: (NewsToday):
> > ""we have had miltos remove our work from his site because of all the
> > shenanigans he's been pulling.
> > I hope that more artists/designers will do the same.
> > cary


Manetas replies :


The U-hauls were never suppose to happen : it was a clever way to get publicity for a show with budged zero made in less than a month.
But the U-hauls were also there : they are the internet pages which host the exhibition: they are invisible vehicles, better and faster than the real ones. Of course, I couldn't say that to the artists or to anybody else, because then it would have never worked.

Andreas Angelidakis replies :


Just imagine the UHauls going up and down Madison: ugly trucks, with out-of-focus shaking projections, obscured by passing traffic. Probably half the projections would not work, the laptops would crash from the movement etc. You get the picture?
instead you get an urban legend, a Loch Ness monster that never materializes, a U.F.O some people claimed to see. And of course a stunning collection of works on line.

Muserna , an artist who is not partecipating in the show, says :
Well Miltos, after your fiasco, I am sure the public will be tired of dealing with you!

Miltos replies : I really hope so : I will relax to Los Angeles then...

cary murnion from HONEST.COM is still very disappointed:
we are asking miltos to remove our work from his site because of all the shenanigans he's been pulling.I hope that more artists/designers will do the same.

Jordan Krane , a designer who participated in the show, says :


If Miltos wants to call what he did art, fine, I really don't have a problem with that.
He has gotten allot of attention, which was one of his goal. Was the project successful? maybe? did it get all of us talking? yes. (and believe me it is fun trying to explain to your Mom , when she asks you, " so your sister said you were in the Whitney Museum, with your art , how did it go?")

Somebody who signs as HONEST ARTIST says :


MM, Just go away!

thorsten iberl, on of the artists of the show, says( e-mail ) :

the u-haul-hoax is great! it is always surprising how easy people can be
made talking about sth, getting nervous about sth... using the media etc.
today, unfortunately,it is all about the appearance, and very often not
about the content, or the artist behind...
.
a drink :

> > currently I'm not visiting this site until miltos buys matt mirapaul a
> > drink.

> > Oh, hell! I think MM needs to get Matt a Uhaul full of the highest grade
Thai hookers and a fully stocked wet/hashish/oxygen bar, plus a couple small
Palladium ingots.